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THE 
ALAGHUAN 



Vol. VI 

1923 



Published by the 

Senior Class 

of the 

Gainesville High 

School 



FOREWORD 



By this, the sixth edition of the 
Alachuan, we, the Class of 1923, en- 
deavor to preserve a record of our 
school days, ivhich may groui dearer 
to us in the years to come as u>e re- 
call our joys and our sorrows, our 
pleasures and our labors. 

If this book be a means of aivah- 
ening in an Alumnus or in a student 
memories of his days in Q. H. S., 
our work will not have been in vain. 



Dedication 



Co Our mothers 



Che noblest thoughts my soul can claim, 
Che holiest words my tongue can frame, 
Unworthy are to praise the name 

IDore sacred than all other. 
M infant when her love first came=- 
E man, 1 find it just the same; 
Reverently 1 breathe her name, 

Che blessed name of mother. 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



FAREWELL TO G. H. S. 

In the far off clays when we were young, 

When our school life had just begun. 

Looking with awe on Seniors great, 

We almost despaired of that lofty state. 

But as we climbed the upward path, 

And conquered demons of English and Math., 

Won our first "G" on the Basketball Court, 

And steered champ titles into port, 

We learned that by much application 

We could hope at last to attain graduation. 

So we loaded our guns and stuck to the fight. 

And kept the oil burning night after night. 

And now at last that the battle's done, 

The fortress stormed and the victory won, 

Deep down in our hearts as the time draws near, 

When we shall no longer be students here, 

We look with sad longing on the days that are gone, 

The sorrows and joys, the trials and fun; 

But it's farewell to thee our Alma Mater clear, 

The scene of our struggles for many a long year. 

Tho' we travel far in the time to come, 

We shall ne'er forget our foster home. 

No, we'll never forget, and this our prayer 

That thy name live on from year to year, 

That thy fame ne'er tarnish, thy glories ne'er fade, 

Which thou thru sacrifice hath made. 

And oh, may thy sons and thy daughters e'er try 

The white light of honor to hold on high! 

So, Classmates, let's drink to Gainesville so dear, 

And bid her farewell with a last rousing cheer! 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



BOARD PUBLIC INSTRUCTION ALACHUA COUNTY, FLORIDA 

Barney R. Colson, Gainesville 

Chairman 

William H. Powell, Archer 

E. G. Spencer, Alachua 

E. R. Simmons, Gainesville 

Superintendent and Secretary 



BOARD OF TRUSTEES 

W. R. Thomas, Chairman 

W. R. McKinstry 

G. W. Welch 




Buchholz, A.B. 
Principal 



THE ALACHU AN 



192 3 




Miss Edna Earle Chesnut 
Coach and Secretary 



J. R. Farrior, A.B. 
University of Florida 
Coach, Algebra, Latin 



Miss Ruth White, A.B. 

Wesleyan College 

English 



Miss Mary Woodberv, M.A. 

Florida State College for Women 

French and English 



Mr. J. Hooper Wise 

University of Florida 

English and Latin 



Mrs. J. M. Leake. A. 

Goucher College 

Mathematics 



Miss Lucy Wood. A.B. 

Florida State College for Women 

Algebra 



10 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




Fritz Hatcher, B.S.Ed. 

University of Florida 

Science 



Miss Edelmira Rivero, A.B. 

Florida State College for Women 

Spanish and English 



Miss Ruby Ware, L.I. 

Columbia College 

History 



A. A. Clayton 

University of Florida 

History 



Miss Lucy Grier, M.S. 

Florida State College for Women 

Science 



Miss Ruth McKenzie, A.B. 

Bessie Tift College 

Latin 



11 



THEALACHUAN 192 3 



ALACHUAN STAFF 



Eddie Sue Colson Editor-in-Chief 

Donald Bishop Associate Editor 

Alice Parrish Literary Editor 

Gardiner Welch Business Manager 

Esther Jordan Historian 

_ I Class Poet 

Hazel Turbyfill -J „,„... 

Class statistician 

Louise Bowers Art Editor 

William Hawkins Joke Editor 

Florence Dial Girls' Basketball Editor 

Hayford Enwall Boys' Basketball Editor 

Allen Haile Eootball Editor 



12 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



THE ALACHUAN STAFF 

Prologue 
This is the role of the Alachuan Staff, 
( Tho' whether they wrote it who can guess ! ) 
Still unto them will credit be given, 
And they will be famous in this land o' the livin . 
(Gentlemen, please remove your hats. I 

1st Spasm 
First there's our chieftain, Eddie Sue, 
Who plans all the work for the others to do. 
But I've heard it whispered by one who knows. 
That when stumped she, too, to Miss Woodbery goes! 
(Applause from the peanut gallery.) 

2nd Fit 
Next there's Louise, who dabbles in art, 
(Tho' they say she's really a nurse at heart, I 
She drew the "cartoons" you can find if you look. 
Of course not the ones in the front of the book! 
(Boys will please not stamp their feet. I 

3rd Conniption 
Then there is Alice, who stories doth write, 
(I should have said Mrs. Parrish by right! ) 
But tho' she is married, she's one of us still, 
And her stories are fine, you may say what you will. 
(Gentlemen, please refrain from throwing peanuts at the actors! 

4th Epileptic 
Also there're William, the maker of jokes, 
Who has more humor than ten common folks, 
And Gardiner, who says jokes are good in their place, 
But to get money you must wear a stern face. 
(Laughter and applause.) 



13 



THEALACHUAN 192 3 



5th Convulsion 
The trio — Hayford, Florence, and Allen — 
Have written up games by the pint and the gallon. 
But their task is more pleasant than at first it seems. 
For they write of four fine championship teams! 
( Rah ! for the Champs ! ) 

6th Apoplectic 
And now comes Mary, the bard of the belles, 
Who of dances and every bridge tea tells. 
And you'll have to admit she ought to know how, 
For couldn't she make even "Willie" Bow! Bow!? 
(Thundering cheers from the audience. I 

7th Attack 
And don't forget Bish, who to tell the whole truth. 
Would rather play football than write, forsooth! 
Still he is loyal, and does not shirk 
Whenever he's asked to help with the work. 
(Audience will please remain till the end.) 

8th Spell 
Last we have Hazel, the Senior poet, 
(Tho' by reading these verses, who would know it? ) 
Hazel is also the class statistician. 

And tells on the Seniors, both their age and ambition! 
(We thank you all for your kind attention.) 

Epilogue 
These then are the chosen Seniors eight, 
Who have labored early and have labored late. 
To edit this book, so now that it's done. 
We'll all take a rest — (and, gosh! we need one! I 

(Finis J 



14 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




MASCOT 
Lucile Boring Strincfellow 



MOTTO 
Eii Avant 



COLORS 
Green and White 



FLOWER 
Shasta Daisy 



16 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




CLASS OFFICERS 

Cecil Gracy President 

Donald Bishop Vice-President 

Thelma Boltin ..Secretary and Treasurer 



Thelma Ann Boltin 
"Teddy" 

"You are looked for, and called for, asked 
for, and sought for" 

Secretary and treasurer of class '23; Senior 
Play '23; "Comet" staff '22, '23; "Class Baby" 
G. H. S. Carnival '22; Dramatic Club '22; 
G. H. S. Minstrel '21; vice president class '20. 



Luther Cecil Gracy 
"Long Distance" 

"Quick in wit, pleasing in manner" 

President of class '23; editor in chief of 
"Comet" '23; "Willie Baxter" Senior Play; 
assistant editor of "Comet" '22; cheer leader 
'22; vice-president of class '22; secretary and 
treasurer of class '21; "Comet" staff '21; 
president of class '20; "G" Club '20. 



Donald Bishop 
"Bish" 

"Who mixed reason with pleasure and ivis- 
dom with mirth" 

Vice-president of class '23; assistant editor 
Alachuan '23; football team '20, "22; basket- 
ball team '20; captain basketball team '20. 



17 



THE ALACHUAN 



19 2.3 




Miriam McKinstry 

"Jane" 

"The day is always hers ivho works in it with 

serenity and great aims" 

Business manager "Comet" '23; assistant 

business manager "Comet" "22; Glee Club "22; 

L. S. S. Club; G. G. Card Club; "0! Lady, 

Lady'" '22; Stunt Night '21; Senior Carnival 

•21. 

John Frederick Selle 
"Shark" 
"None but himself can be his parallel" 
Senior Play '23; assistant editor Putnam 
Prattler "21. "22; president Freshman Class "19 
Palatka; member Glee Club "21, '22 Palatka: 
manager football te-m '21; minager basket- 
ball team '21; football team '21 Palatka. 

Howard Bishop 

"Horse" 
"Happy am 1, from care I'm free. 
If hy aren't they all contented like me?" 
Senior Plav '23; basketball '22, '23; base- 
ball '22, '23; football '22; track '23: discus 
1st; high jump 1st; "G" Club: Carnival '21. 
'22. '23. 

Annie Mae Gunn 
"Runt" 
"All things I thought I knew, that note confess 
The more I know, 1 know I knoiv the less" 
Entered G. H. S. from Marianna H. S. "20: 
Glee Club "21. "22; G. H. S. Carnival "21. '22; 
Stunt Night '20, '22. 

Florence Elizareth Dial 
"'Prune" 
"She makes a July's day short as a 
December's" 
Alachuan Staff '23; senior plav '23; vice- 
president of L. S. S.; G. G. Card 'Club; Glee 
Club '21. '22; "0! Lady. Lady" "22; Senior 
Carnival "21. 



18 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




Gladys Kelley 

"Irish"' 

"We knoiv ivhat we are, but know not what 

we may be" 

Chairman "Queen of Carnival" contest '22; 

Glee Club '22; Vaudeville '22; Tennis Club 

'21; Stunt Night '21; Delta Sigma Gamma; 

G. G. Card Club. 

Gardiner Warren Welch 

"Comfort" 

"// you once know this business man, you are 

sure to like him fine" 

Business manager Alachuan '23; Senior Play 

'23; basketball team '20. '21, '22; manager 

football team '20, '21, '22; athletic editor 

"Comet" '21. 

Mary Elizabeth Kincaid 

"Kinky" 

"She will outstrip all praise and make it halt 

behind her" 

Alachuan Staff '23; Glee Club '23; L. S. S. 

Club; G. G. Card Club; Dramatic Club '22; 

Carnival '21, '22; "Lola Pratt" Senior Play. 

Agnes McCormick 
"Bill" 
"A rare compound of oddity, frolic and fun, 
To relish a joke, and rejoice in a pun" 

Abchuan Staff '23; "Comet" Staff '23; "Jane 
Baxter" in Senior Play; Glee Club '23; G. G. 
Card Club; president class '22: G. H. S. Car- 
nival '21, '22; "Comet" Staff '22. 

Ernest Lamar Sarra 
"Lemmie" 
"He can play ball, EAT and talk, 'tis true, 
And goodness knows what else he can do" 

"Comet" Staff '23; Senior Play '23; track 
'22, '23; football all state '21, '22; captain 
second all state team '22; captain baseball 
'22, '23; "G" Club; president Freshman class 
'22. 



19 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




Louise Bowers 
"Sweetie" 
"She seizes hearts, not waiting for consent, 
Like sudden death, that snatches unprepared. 
Like fire from heaven, scarce seen so soon 
as felt" 
Alachuan Staff "23: Glee Club '23; treasurer 
Dramatic Club "22; Stunt Night '22; School 
Carnival '21, '22; tennis tournament '21. 

Hayford O. Enwall 

"Deacon" 

"He promulgates his esoteric cogitations with 

platitudinous ponderosity" 

Manager basketball team '23; "Comet" 

Staff "23: Alachuan Staff "23: Senior Play '23; 

"G" Club "23: basketball team "22. "23; Glee 

Club "20; High School Orchestra "20. 

Eddie Sue Colson 

"Pansy" 

"Think of me as you please" 

Editor-in-Chief Alachuan "23: Virgil Club 

"23; designer of G. H. S. seal "23: Dnmatic 

Club "22; Tennis Club '22; Vaudeville '21. 



Walter Roby Boone 
"Daniel Boone" 
"Kindness in women, not their beauteous 
looks, shall win my love" 
Basketball team "23; track team '23: base- 
ball team '23 ; "G" Club '23 ; football team '22. 



Mary Jane Baker 
"Gawky" 

"She is an athlete, take her for all in all, 1 
shall not look upon her like again" 
Varsity basketball "20. '21, "22. '23; man- 
ager basketball team '23; all state forward "21. 
'23; Sophomore tennis tournament '20: "G" 
Club; Tennis Club '20. 



■2 



THE ALACHUAN 



192 3 




Lillian Laura Long 

"Long Lily" 

"Do you not know I am a woman? When I 

think, I must speak" 

Glee Club '23; Senior Candy Sale; "May 

Parcher" in Senior Play; L. S. S. Club; G. G. 

Card Club; "Comet" Staff '22; vice-president 

class '21. 



Withers Allen Haile, Jr. 

"Boll-weevil" 

"He who is firm in will, moulds the world to 

himself" 

Alachuan Staff '23; joint manager Senior 

Candy Sale '23; "George Crooper" Senior 

Play. 

Mary Parker McCraw 
"Mary Parkie" 
"Studying is foolish, my mind is more to dress 
and love inclined" 
Senior Play '23; vice-president L. S. S.; "0! 
Lady. Lady" '22; Glee Club '21, '22; Car- 
nival '21. 



Ruth Harrelle Riddick 

"Harry" 

"As sweet as a primrose that peeps beneath a 

thorn" 

Glee Club '23; four years in G. H. S. 



D. S. Facan 

"Pokey" 

"Not so quiet as not to show his merits" 

Novice track team '23; football squad '22; 

soccer team '21. 



21 



THE ALACHUAN 



192 3 




Eleanor Bryant 
"Elene" 
"She is no less than what we say she is" 
Virgil Club '23; Pierrette Play '22: four 
years in G. H. S. 



William Leurer Colson 

"Lubber" 

A man of good repute, carriage, bearing, and 

estimation" 

Four years in G. H. S. ; soccer team '21. '22. 



Virginia Estelle Cheves 
"Stale Cheese" 
"Of many good, I think her best" 
Four years in G. H. S. 



Thomas Jerome Isler 

"Mutt" 

''This honest creature doubtless sees and 

knows more, much more, than he unfolds" 

Virgil Club '23: entered G. H. S. from De- 

Soto Hiab School '22: K. K. D. Club. D. H. S. 



Sarah Elizabeth Garle 

"Eliz" 

"Life is real; life is earnest" 

Four years in G. H. S.: Virgil Club "23. 



22 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




William Hawkins, Jr. 
"Bill" 
"1 remember him well, and I remember him 
worthy of thy praise" 
Alachuan Staff '23; "Comet" Staff '22, '23; 
Virgil Club '23; entered G. H. S. from Sum- 
merlin Institute '21. 

William Hamon Powell, Jr. 

"Bill" 

"Take what is; trust what may be; that's 

Life's true lesson" 

Dramatic Club '22; Stunt Night '22. 

Esther Chesnut Jordan 
"Nutt" 
"Speak little and well, if you wish to be con- 
sidered as possessing merit" 
Class Historian '23; Glee Club '22, '23; G. 
G. Card Club; business manager Senior Play. 

Hazel Margaret Turbyfilll 

"Curly" 

"I have heard of the lady, and good works 

ivent with her name" 

Senior poet and statistician '23; winner of F. 
S. C. W. Essay Contest '23; Glee Club '23; 
Spanish Club '21 ; entered G. H. S. from 0. 
H. S. '22. 

Alice Willoughby Parrish 
"Bride" 
"0, ye gods, render me worthy of my noble 
husband" 
Literary Editor Alachuan '23; "Comet" Staff 
'23; Glee Club '23; Carnival '21; "Comet" 
Staff '20; entered G. H. S. from Southern Col- 
lege '22; Sigma Delta Literary Society '22; 
Orchestra '22. 



23 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




Faye Turner 
"Fadie" 
"There is a soft and pensive Graa. 
A cast of thought upon her face" 
Glee Club "22, "23; Dramatic Club '22; G. 
H. S. Carnival "22; Stunt Night "20, "22. 

Lars Sanchez 

"Hunky" 

"He was ivont to do gym stunts, and to talk 

to the ladies" 

Football team '23; basketball team "23; 

track "23; baseball "23; "G" Club "23. 

Ida Lucile Williams 
"Cele"' 
"But 1 thought there nas more in her than 1 
could think" 
Southern College "21 ; Epsilon Lamba Sig- 
ma; Hiking Club; Tennis Club; basketbill 
team "21; Waycross, Ga. "22: vice-president 
Literary Society; Glee Club: secretary and 
treasurer class "22; entered G. H. S. '23; Glee 
Club "23. 

Witsel Sherwood Black 
"Sheep" 
"It is not enough to be industrious; so are the 
ants. What are you industrious about?" 
Football team '21; "G" Club "21; Fresh- 
man "Comet"' reporter '20. 

Leahman Donn 

"Leman" 

"It is not doing the thing we like to do. but 

liking the thing we hare to do. that makes 

life blessed" 

Freshman, Harrison. Arkansas; Sophomore, 

Micanopy, Florida; entered G. H. S. "21. 



24- 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




Willie Edelstein 

"Villie" 

"We would think you bright if you'd tell us 

all you might" 

Football team '21, '22; "G" Club. 

Elsie L. Williams 
"L. C." 

"She never uses paint, 

Never tries to make us think she is what she 
ain't" 
Entered G. H. S. "23; Glee Club '23. 

Agnes Ruth Barton 
"Aggie" 
"Nothing do I see in you 
That I can find should merit any hate" 
Four years in G. H. S. 

Margaret Olive Seay 
"Maggie" 
"/ feel within me 

A peace above all earthly dignities, 
A still and quiet conscience" 
Four years in G. H. S. 



25 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




26 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 



SENIORS AS THEY WERE 



1 Miss Mary Woodbery 

2 Elizabeth Gable 

3 Lucile Williams 

4 Gladys Kelley 

5 Eddie Sue Colson 

6 Cecil Gracy 

7 Hayford Enwall 

8 Louise Bowers 

9 Leuber Colson 

10 Alice Willoughby 

11 Miriam McKinstry 

12 Allen Haile 

13 Margaret Seay 

14 Agnes Barton 

15 William Powell 



16 Lars Sanchez 

17 Lamar Sarra 

18 Donald Bishop 

19 Howard Bishop 

20 Elsie Williams 

21 William Hawkins 

22 Mary Kincaid 

23 Agnes McCormick 

24 Esther Jordan 

25 Elizabeth Harrold 

26 Mary Parker McCraw 

27 Thomas Isler 

28 John Selle 

29 Faye Turner 

30 Florence Dial 



31 Hazel Turbyfill 

32 Annie Mae Gunn 

33 Witsell Black 

34 Estelle Cheves 

35 D. S. Fagan 

36 Thelma Boltin 

37 Eleanor Bryant 

38 Leahman Dodd 

39 Mary Baker 

40 Gardiner Welch 

41 Lillian Long 

42 Ruth Riddick 

43 Roby Boone 

44 Willie Edelstein 



IT RIMES 



Old woman lived in shoe, 

Didn't know what to do. 

Heap o' kids sassy lot; 

Nothin' to eat in the pot. 

Woman did — cook brew. 
Couldn't fill greedy crew. 

John chied Esther bawled, 

Annie Mae yawned Alice crawled. 



Howard grinned- 
He ne'er cared — 



— silly brat, 
-for a' that. 



Donald frowned looked around, 

Saw Leuber on the ground. 

Miriam fell after him, 

Bumped head bam, bim. 

Cecil did fly kite, 

All-day-sucker Lamar bite. 

Little Hayford he did tease 

For a place by Louise. 

Allen pouted wouldn't play, 

Sat on hill — all the day. 

Gardiner won all his marbles, 

They did have awful squabbles. 

Lillian peeped behind shoe, 

Cooed, "Boo, boo Eddie Sue." 

Very fast Pansy ran, 

Knocked Faye in the san'. 

Maggie, Agnes Elsie, Bill, 

Stood frightened on the hill. 



Jack McDowall— 
Struck his head- 



Jumped so high, 
— 'gainst the sky. 

"More soup" Mary said, 

"Soup, William or I'll be dead." 

Florence, Hazel Estelle, Leahman, 

Wicked as four little demons. 

"Call Eleanor" pleaded Lizzy, 

"Miss Woodbery I'm too busy." 

Thelma hid behind the shoe, 

To show herself wouldn't do. 

She did dring all the brew, 

Goin' to get whipping too. 

Mary Parker then did creep 

O'er the shoe so very steep. 

Lars pitched big old ball, 

Hit Mary made her squall. 

Roby, blue forsaken looks, 

Ruth gave him her books. 

Kinky headed little Willie. 

Green as leaves on a lily. 

Tiny Agnes peeped out o' toe, 

Looking 'round for a beau. 

Mischievous Witsell Black, 

Hard to keep on his track. 

Terrible rumor spread, 

That o' woman lived in dread. 



Of children — 
And at night- 



-to be fed, 
— put to bed. 



■27- 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 

SENIOR CLASS 

(An Historical Drama in One Act) 

Place — Senior Assembly Room. Time — June 8, 1923. 

Judge — Professor Buchholz. 

Gentlemen of the Jury — The Faculty. 

Enter the defendant, Senior Class (looking rather the worse for wear and tear). 

The Clerk, Profs secretary, Edna Earle Chesnut (sternly) : "Order in the 
court room! We are now ready to try Senior Class of '23, to determine whether or 
not he has attained the standard required to graduate from G. H. S. The first wit- 
ness for the defendant will please take the stand." 

Senior Class: "Scholarship will come forward first." 

Scholarship (Reluctantly extracting his nose from between the pages of a huge 
volume): "Judge and gentlemen of the jury, I have been with Senior Class 
for four long years (not to mention the Grammar Grades!) and I know he's a pre- 
cocious child. Why, just think! he won two prizes and honorable mention in the 
F. S. W. C. essay contest in one year! Isn't that a fine record?" 

Judge: "Fine, fine, but Scholarship alone doesn't make a school. Let's hear 
from Athletics." 

Athletics ( Staggering under a load of State championships ) : "Your Honor. 
Senior Class is an old friend of mine and he surely has been a loyal one. All through 
High School he's supported me faithfully, but this past year (and I hope his last 
year), why, my goodness! he just walked away with all the honors! He won the 
inter-class track meet; had six men on the basketball squad; helped win three 
State championships, and then went to work and broke two State track records to 
win another! Who could beat that? Now don't you think Senior Class deserves to 
graduate?" 

Judge: "Very good. But no, not yet. We have several more witnesses to hear 
from. Senior Class, let's hear what School Spirit has to say for you." 

Senior Class: "Take the stand, School Spirit. (Aside.) And for goodness sake 
remember the Duval game and back me up." 

School Spirit: "I only wish to say, sir, that Senior Class has certainly made good 
use of me during his school career. And you know he couldn't have accomplished 
half so much in athletics without me!" (Puffing out his chest and clearing his 
throat.) 

Judge: "Enough! We realize all that! What have you done in the dramatic 
line, Senior Class?" 

Senior Class: "Come, Dramatics, stop powdering your nose and speak for me." 

Dramatics (Proudly) : "Sir, why ask? If you saw 'Seventeen' when Senior 
Class put it on, I'll warrant you enjoyed the best laugh you've had in years. Didn't 
you now, and wasn't it fine from start to finish?" 

Judge: "Yes, 'Seventeen' certainly was a credit to Senior Class, as well as to his 
school. Well, let's hear from Good Conduct." 

Senior Class: "Good Conduct! (Aside.) "Where is that fellow?" 

Good Conduct (Arriving at the last moment): "Here, sir! Better late than 

28 



THEALACHUAN 1923 

never! Well, I can only say that I have done my best to stick by Senior Class through 
High School, and to keep him out of trouble. But the jury alone can tell you how well I 
have succeeded. (And I do hope they pass him. I need a rest! )" 

Judge: "I will refer the matter to the jury. What about finances?" 

Finance: "I'm right here, sir, and I feel that I must tell you that Senior Class 
made $70.00 on their candy sale this year. The way that candy hated to leave 
Senior Class just showed what a sweet person he was, but it's all gone now, and I 
know he is glad." 

Senior Class: "Sir, are you not going to hear Society? Here she has been 
waiting all this time, and a lady, too!" 

Judge: "Oh, yes! Certainly let's hear her!" 

Senior Class (Aside to Athletics): "Now, we are safe — he never could resist 
the ladies!" 

Society: "Your Honor, I certainly have some good news to tell. The L. S. S. 
Club is thriving, and I also organized the G. G. Card Club this year. Then there was 
the picnic at Earlton Beach that the class of '22 said they enjoyed so much. And 
who could forget the Junior-Senior banquet, or Hayford Enwall's Hallowe'en party? 
(Or that mysterious fortune teller, with her magic charms?)" 

Judge: "That's all right. I see you have done your duty. How about a Glee 
Club?" 

Glee Club: "Sir, I've only known Senior Class for the past two years, but I 
certainly will miss his 'fresh young voice' ( ? ) when he goes." 

Judge: "Well, Senior Class, if you have nothing more to say for yourself, I 
will now turn the case over to the jury." 

Senior Class: "Nothing, sir." 

Judge: "Very well. The gentlemen of the jury will please retire." 

Exit the jury. 

Re-enter the jury almost immediately. 

Speaker of the Jury: "Your Honor, we have unanimously decided that Senior 
Class has been faithful and loyal in all things, and is certainly entitled to graduate 
from this school." 

(Senior Class heaves a sigh of relief.) 

Judge: "You have heard the verdict, and if that is all, the case is dismissed." 



A SENIOR'S DREAM 

I'm tired of studying the whole day through, 

And tired of doing as I'm told to do; 

I'd like to go where the mocking-bird sings, 

And fly ( if mortals could do such things ) , 

'Way, 'way up in the azure sky, 

And drift and dream 'mong the clouds so high! 

So I'll take my freedom and away I'll go, 

And never return to the plodders below. 



29 



1 & 



o I 



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■41 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




32 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



THE SENIOR PLAY 

"Seventeen." Booth Tarkington's well-known play, was cleverly staged by the 
class of '23. The actors were admirably suited to the play, for all they had to do 
was to act natural (except, perhaps, Lola Pratt! I and this they did as only seventeen- 
year-olds can do. 

The cast included the best talent to be found in the Senior Class, and each 
carried off his or her part in a way that deserves much credit. Cecil Gracy as "Willie 
Baxter," Mary Kincaid as "Lola Pratt," and Thehna Boltin as "Mrs. Baxter," de- 
serve special mention, and we must not leave Agnes McCormick's name off this list, 
for as "Jane" she did much toward making the play the success that it was. Each 
part was acted so splendidly, though, that it would be hard to do justice to each 
individual's work. 

The cast included: 

Mr. Baxter .. John Selle 

A staid business man and his wife 
Mrs. Baxter _ Thelma Boltin 

who understands the troubles of "Seventeen" and tries to discip- 
line her little daughter, 
Jane Agnes McCormick 

the torment of her big brother, 
William Sylvanus Baxter Cecil Gracy 

who, together with his friends, 

Joe Bullit Howard Bishop 

Johnny Watson Hayford Enwall 

Wallie Banks Lars Sanchez 

and 
George Crooper Allen Haile 

is desperately in love with 
Lola Pratt Mary Kincaid 

(the baby-talk lady), who with her dog, Flopit, is visiting her 

friend, 
May Parcher Lillian Long 

to the huge disgust of May's father, 
Mr. Parcher Gardiner Welch 

and to the chagrin of her girl friends, 
Ethel Boke Mary Parker McCraw 

and 

Mary Brooks - Florence Dial 

Genesis Lamar Sarra 

who, ivith his dog, "Clem," is always on hand to spoil Willie's 

best-laid plans. 



33 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 

THE FABLE OF THE TWO BROTHERS 

(No Apologies to Aesop) 

nUTHER JONES was a bright boy. Everybody said so. And it was true, 
for he could lisp his A B C's at the tender age of three, and when he en- 
tered the village school at six years of age he read the whole Primer thru 
at one sitting. He was promptly sent to' the second grade, where he was promoted 
to the third in less than a week. Here he remained for the rest of the term, leading 
in all his classes and finally exhibiting a report card teeming with 100's. So it was 
through all of young Luther's school career. He romped through his high school 
course in three years and finished with the highest average in his class. 

Luther's father used to gaze upon him in fond pride and say to himself, "My 
son will be a great man some day. He will astonish the world with his learning. He 
shall become a professor in some famous university, and there fill his position with 
credit to himself and to the father who reared him!" 

Now Luther had a brother, Henry, four years older than himself. Henry was 
a loafer, a bonehead, and a general nuisance. It took him twelve years to finish 
four grades of school, and at the end of that time his father gave up in despair and 
put him on the farm to work. But Henry did not work. He would go fishing when 
sent for the cows, play marbles when told to chop wood, and spend his evenings 
reading "Snappy Stories," while Luther, across the table, was diligently pursuing 
the square root of a Latin verb. At last his father's patience wore thru and he pre- 
sented Henry with fifty dollars, ordering him to "clear out, and paddle his own 
canoe." Henry blinked in amazement, but accepted the fifty dollars and took a 
train for New York. Here he got a job as truck driver, for that was one thing he 
could do, having spent many, many hours in coaxing his father's flivver to run. 

Meanwhile, Luther finished college, took two years of post-graduate work, and 
then traveled abroad for a year. After that he returned to America and sat back 
waiting for some great institution to humbly beg his services — at a handsome salary, 
of course. The offer came, and from a prominent university, but, lo and behold ! 
the salary was small — exceedingly small! Luther accepted it, however, and became 

professor of Stone Age History, in Lniversity. He gave long and learned 

lectures and his classes soon became favorites with all the students, for he never 
required them to recite — it took him the whole of every class period to finish tell- 
ing what he knew about the lesson. So went life with Luther, his cap and gown be- 
coming worn and thin, patched in places, but still being used, for he could not 
afford new ones. Ten years later Luther was still a poor, but learned, bachelor pro- 
fessor in University, and author of several hundred deeply scholarly books. 

But Henry ten years later! He had, while cussing over the worthlessness of 
automobile engines in general and spark plugs in particular, conceived a new idea 
manufacturing spark plugs. He had sold his idea for a princely sum and all the 
preferred stock in the company which was immediately organized to manufacture 
the new spark plugs. He made a fortune that ran into seven figures, and then one 
Christmas he decided to go back to the old home farm. It happened that Luther 
came home the same Christmas, and when their father looked at his two sons, and 
thought of what they had been as boys — he broke down and wept. 

Moral: Don't study too hard; it doesn't always get you the dollars. 
34 — 



<<T< J 



& 



fe 




JUNIORS 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




JUNIOR CLASS 

Officers 

Dorothy Lartigue President 

James Brinson Vice-President 

Ellen Pepper Secretary-Treasurer 

Motto 
''Nothing great ivas ever achieved without enthusiasm" 

Colors Flower 

Black and Gold Marechal Niel Rose 



36 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 



JUNIOR CLASS 



Julia Holly 
W. D. O'QUinn 
Mollie GreeNberg 

Jim McClamroch 
Ruby CellOn 
Webster MerRitt 

Sabina Worthington 

Roland StanLey 
Delphine RascO 

Julia TOmkies 
William JacKson 

Helen CUbberly 
Cecil ThompSon 

Leacy SmOot 
Katherine Voyle 

AlbErt Swariz 
Billie BuRke 

Zilla Bodie 
KathErine Tucker 
Tessie GLass 
Dorothy McLamroch 

Mary BEula McCormick 
Corinne Spencer 

JAmes Brinson 
EThel Tucker 
Huber Watson 
Dot BuLlard 
Dempsey CrEary 

NorTon Kilbourne 
Ellen Pepper 
Emily DorSey 



George Smith 
Marcus EdelsTein 

SUe Spencer 
Lenore PollarD 

FayE Bergson 
Averil McMillaN 

Laura STrunk 

ChaSe Maddox 

Joe WauGh 
Lathan ThOrnton 
Ruth LivingstOn 
Louise KincaiD 

NoyeS Long 
Marvin Phifer 
Laura ThOmpson 
Dot LaRtigue 
Bill Truby 
Ed Swearingen 

Joe Perry 

GLenn Rivers 
Ila Mae BryAnt 

FranCis Emerson 
Alberta Brilgham 
Stephen Duke 

Ralph ATwater 
Mary SHaw 

NilEs Bashaw 

JamEs Turbeville 
Clara BrenNan 

AlexanDer King 



37- 



THEALACHUAN 192 3 



COMIN' THROUGH THE HALL 

If a Junior see a Junior, 
Passing through the hall, 
If a Junior greet a Junior 
Need the teachers bawl? 

Every flapper has a sweetie, 

I claim none at all; 

But Bill and Joe slip notes to me, 

When passing through the hall. 

If a Junior take a Junior, 

In his car to town, 

If these two miss just one class, 

How those teachers frown! 

Every flapper has a sweetie, 
Some say I have none; 
But in Jim's car I've been to ride, 
For lots more times than one. 

College men are mighty nice, 
A big frat dance's fun, 
But let me have a Junior boy 
If I must just take one. 

Every flapper has a sweetie, 

I claim none at all; 

But Junior boys all catch my eye, 

When passing through the hall. 



38 




THE ALACHUAN 1923 



THIS FREEDOM 

(With such apologies to Mr. Hutchinson as he may think necessary) 
S ROSALIE came down the school steps with her first month's report, every- 
thing seemed entirely satisfying. She knew her grades were excellent. But 
as she passed a group of girls she knew talking to some boys from the col- 
lege, her grades seemed a little less important. She walked on alone and 
forgot the pleasure of a moment before when she thought about what a good time 
they were having back there. What fun it would be to go with college boys! She 
never did any thing interesting, just study, and go to church, and now and then a 
church social. Of course, there were boys there but mother and dad never let her have 
dates, they were so old fashioned. What a good time Rhoda and Jean and the rest of 
the crowd had ! They went to all the dances and had dates nearly every night. Here 
her thoughts were interrupted by an automobile horn, and Marie stopped at the curb. 
Lucky Marie, popularity, looks, and a car! "Don't you want a lift with all those 
books? My, but you're studious, making ninety-five in geometry! I flunked it and 
chem, too. Oh, well, we can't all be bright. Let's go out to the U." 

As they passed through the college gates Marie jammed on the brakes and 
sounded the horn. "There are Ted and Harry," and she hailed them. "Ted's mine, 
but be nice to Harry, he's worth it." 

Introductions over, Rosalie and Harry moved to the back seat and they sped on 
through the campus toward the country. By the time they reached the campus again, 
near sunset, Rosalie had made up her mind to several things. So when Harry asked 
for a date for the following Friday, she assented in spite of a slight doubt in her 
mind as to her parents' consent. 

After they dropped the boys at their frat house, Rosalie asked Marie what she 
meant by "worth it." "He will be richer than any one in this town next year when 
he is twenty-one," Marie explained. "The girl he marries will be in luck. Be nice to 
him." 

"How foolish to think of marrying him!" Rosalie thought. Foolish Rosalie! 
How could she know that in only a few months it would be her only thought? That 
nothing would matter more. 

Not until she neared home did Rosalie begin to worry about her date. How was 
she to manage her parents? Thank goodness she had that good report to show them! 
It was a happy Rosalie that went to bed that night. She could have dates! Thrilling 
thought! She could hardly wait until Friday. 

Friday came and the date, wonderful thing. Rosalie felt it was a success, for he 
asked for another. And another. 

Strike on! 

Several weeks later the big football dance was to come off and Harry asked her 
to go. To Rosalie this seemed the most desirable thing in the world. How wonderful 
it would be! This would assure her place in that realm that seemed the height of 
attainment. Yes, this was most greatly to be desired. But how could she ever manage 
it? Mother would never consent. But she would go, somehow. Then the idea oc- 
curred to her. She could slip out of her bed room window as easily as anything. 
They'd never know. So she told her plan to Harry. "Flies and Flu," he said. "Romeo 
stuff at your bed room window. You're a sport all right." 

Strike on! 

The night of the dance was here. She was dressing. Harry was there. She was 
outside the window. She was at the dance. Wonderful dance! Wonderful music and 
boys and popularity. She was rushed to death. Entrancing evening. Wonderful 
Harry to cause all this. The things too poignant for the words one has. This girl's 
happiness was very great, not, to be set in words. Words cannot define that which 
defies our comprehension, which to our comprehensian only sublimely IS. 

Strike on! 

39 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



A month later you would not have known our Rosalie. It is enough to say she 
was a super college-widow. Her sole interest was college boys and frat dances. And 
Harry — but that comes later. Meanwhile semester exams were upon her. Now they 
were past. Awful marks, barely passing, but what did grades matter, what did school 
matter? Foolish Rosalie, how was she to know that some day it would mean every- 
thing? 

How could one ever have foreseen that? 

Strike on ! 

During the next month she saw Harry often. Yes, he liked her. But Rosalie 
wanted more than that. "He will be richer than anyone in this town when he's twen- 
ty-one. The girl he marries will be in luck," Marie had said. 

Strike on! 

A month later. She was sure of Harry now. She knew she had him. Yes, she 
almost admitted it to the girls. How could she foresee that one morning she was to 
pick up the paper and see the announcement of his enegagement to a girl in his home 
town? 

How could one have foreseen that? 

Strike on! 

Meanwhile she has gone to many dances. She is not so rushed as she was at her 
first one, but she still goes to them all. The most important dance which comes almost 
at the last of the season is just a month off. She will have a lovely new dress for it. 

The dance is just a week off. Why doesn't her invitation come? All the other 
girls have theirs. Of course Harry will ask her. Then the awful thing happens. She 
sees the announcement of Harry's engagement. Sickening dread. Thursday before 
the dance. Then a boy phones and asks her to go. She accepts. Foolish Rosalie! 

Strike on! 

The night of the dance. How many visiting girls there are! How pretty they 
are! And their clothes! Her dress seems cheap. All the boys want to dance with 
them. What a dull time she has! Why, she's almost a wallflower! At the intermis- 
sion she sees Harry. He's coming across the floor with a most beautiful girl. She 
would like to run. She turns; they're almost at her. "Rosalie," he is saying, "I want 
you to meet my fiance." The thing's too poignant for the words one has. 

Strike on! 

Just two more weeks of school. Those awful exams. Why did her two hardest 
ones have to come the day after the Junior Prom? She'd been flunking for tw r o 
months, but she could cram. 

Strike on ! 

The night of the Prom. (She wasn't asked to go until the night before, when she 
was asked to substitute for an out-of-town girl who could not come.) More visiting 
girls than ever. She was a wallflower sure enough. Awful dance, she thought, and 
awful exams tomorrow. 

Strike on ! 

The last day of school. Again we see her coming down the school steps with her 
report. No smiling, happy Rosalie this time. She has flunked every thing. 

Postscript 

There was to have been some more of it, but there, there she is a failure, and 
one has pitied her so much one cannot any more go on. One's pitied so! One has 
looked backward with her. The heart must break but for a forward glimpse: 

She's all right now. That old life is over. Her days are simple and peaceful and 
full of labor she loves. How entrancing her geometry, how wonderful her English. 
how musical her French, how interesting her chemistry! All through breakfast she 
can hardly wait. When breakfast's done she's at her books. She cries in a delighted 
voice, "Lessons! Lessons!" She cries in a delighted voice, "Lessons. Lessons! All 
day long! All day long!" The End 
— —40 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




■ggg5S5S5BK"** — 1^ iff 

"THSSSIBjSgF* " 

j&LAiJg* 

SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Officers 

Mary Anderson _ ^President 

Bill Boltin Vice-President 

Melba Nunn Secretary and Treasurer 

Motto 
Each for the other; all for G. H. S. 

Colors Flower 

Green and Gold Yellow Chrysanthemum 



42 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 



Carroll Adams 
Gordon Adams 
Mary Anderson 
Wayne Ashmore 
James Beall 
Doris Black 
Bill Boltin 
Ernest Bowyer 
A. W. Brown 
Annie Bryan 
Julia Carruthers 
Ruth Clayton 
James Clements 
Gaynell Corbett 
Charles Dell 
Maxey Dell 
Bill Dial 
William Duke 
Anna Eve 
Edward Eve 
Marshall Flowers 
Lucile Gaskins 
Ada Glenn 



SOPHOMORE CLASS 

Ted Girard 
Aylene Graves 
Theresa Graves 
Esther Greenberg 
Grace Haile 
Charles Harris 
Lyle Hiatt 
Bryant Hiers 
Kenneth Hodges 
Mary Hyatt 
Maybelle Irving 
Louise Isler 
Frank Johnson 
Aline Kelley 
Flossie Kite 
Hilda Mathis 
Louise McCutcheon 
J. C. McCraw 
Sue McDonald 
Louise Mcintosh 
Billie McKinstry 
Albert Murphree 
Melba Nunn 



Roy Nunn 
Maxwell Overton 
Myrtle Peeler 
Joe Pomeroy 
Mary Anne Price 
John Prevatt 
Sledge Prevatt 
Gilbert Ramsey 
Hawley Ridenour 
Doris Roberts 
Irene Roberts 
W. R. Soper 
Ruby Short 
Wilmer Thomas 
Richard Weaver 
Bessie Weeks 
Gladys Wells 
Rosalie Williams 
Ruth Williamson 
Lois Worthington 
Mary Wright 
Theo Zetrouer 



43 



THE ALACHUAN 192 3 



ELEGY OF THE PASSING SOPHS 

Show us not with solemn faces, 
Algebra problems by the scores; 

For next year we will be Juniors: 
We're no longer sophomores. 

Now at last we have passed Caesar, 

"On to Virgil" is the call; 
You've flunked Caesar — must repeat it, 

Was not spoken of us all. 

We liked English Composition, 

Everything was parallel; 
Next we'll study Junior English, 

Think we'll like it just as well. 

Webster's Modern History told us, 
How the governments should be; 

We'll now learn how England's rulers 
Helped her gain Democracy. 

Whether we are Rats or Juniors, 
Sophs or Seniors, one thing's best: 

'Tis the fact that we are known as 
Students of the G. H. S. 

— D. B., 25 



Some of these days, in many big ways, 

O, what a great class we'll see 

Pulling together — studying forever, 

How happy we ought to be 

O'er our victory. 

Much has been written and said, we know, 

Of our Sophomore Class with its wit galore; 

Remember to be a Junior Class A 

Each one must be a Sophomore. 

— S. McD., '25. 



44 



THE ALACHUA N 



1923 




FRESHMAN CLASS 

Officers 

Margaret Tucker President 

Dale Vansickle Vice-President 

Nancy Baker Secretary and Treasurer 

Colors Flower 

Gold and White Shasta Daisy 

Motto 
"Doiit be a crank; be a self-starter" 



46 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 



FRESHMAN CLASS 



Freeman Ashmore 
Earle Arnow 
Austin Armstead 
Oscar Beasly 
Julian Broome 
Maude Ballentine 
Marjory Bell 
Bronnie Bryant 
Nancy Baker 
Wilbur Bishop 
William Bullard 
Langly Bryant 
James Cromwell 
Ruby Couch 
Parks Carmichael 
May Davis 
Ethel Donaldson 
Bob Davis 
Tom Downs 
Ella-Maude Downs 
Frances DePass 
Barton Douglas 
Laura Dodd 
Anita Ellis 
Sinclair Eaton 
Earle Fa°;an 



Ruth Grimes 
Gussie Gay 
Lois Gay 
Geneva Gnann 
Sanford Goin 
Ella Mae Hazen 
Reba Hill 
Edgar Johnwick 
Emma Jackson 
Dan Jenkins 
Clarence Killinger 
Benjamin Kendrick 
Dorothy Livingston 
Andrew Ludwig 
Rodney Layton 
Myrtice Mooring 
Angus Merritt 
Barnett Means 
Virginia McCraw 
Paige McArthur 
Luther McDowall 
Dawn Nobles 
Isabelle O'Neal 
Martin Oliver 
Helen Parker 
Theron Pomeroy 



Ellis Parker 
Eva Ramsey 
Roy Rossell 
Joseph Rice 
Sidney Robertson 
Nellda Reed 
Almey Sargeant 
Paul Selle 
Johnnie Sanders 
Clare Sneeringer 
Hulda Snelson 
Earle Simpson 
Pauline Short 
Harry Turner 
Margaret Tucker 
Charles Tucker 
Duke Truby 
Brooks Thornton 
Evan Taylor 
Vera Turner 
Mildred Tomkies 
Dale Vansickle 
Mary Wright 
Rae Weeks 
Richard White 
Alexander Waits 



47- 




s ^ 






:=£ 



o > 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



FOOTBALL 

The G. H. S. football team has completed the most successful season in the 
history of the school. The team this year was a thoroughly efficient machine which 
administered defeat to every football team of importance in the state. This was due 
to the excellent coaching ability of J. R. Farrior and the earnest cooperation of the 
squad. 

This team played 11 games, lost none and was scored on only twice for a total 
of 18 points, while their total against the opposing aggregations was 461 points, thus 
gaining for themselves and their school the football championship of the State of 
Florida. The citizens of Gainesville showed their appreciation by presenting gold 
footballs to the mmebers of the team. 



G. H. S. FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

Date Opponent Place G.H.S. Op'n't 

Oct. 14 Orlando Gainesville 58 

Oct. 21 Hillsborough Tampa 13 

Oct. 28 Lakeland Lakeland 7 

Nov. 4 Plant City Gainesville 35 

Nov. 11 Madison ! Madison 97 

Nov. 17 Greensboro Tallahassee 30 

Nov. 18 Tallahassee Tallahassee 39 6 

Nov. 24 St. Petersburg Gainesville 59 

Nov. 30 Bartow Gainesville 40 

Dec. 9 Duval Gainesville 25.: 12 

Dec. 16 Miami Gainesville 58 

Total Score 461 18 



■51 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 



GIRLS' BASKETBALL REVIEW OF '23 



XN January 13, the first goal was tossed for the season of nineteen twenty- 
three and was a starting point for the ten battles fought and won by "our 
girls," who, by their courage and perseverance, attained the high honor of 
champions of the State of Florida for the second time. 
With the beginning of the season Coach Chesnut industriously set to work to 

produce a team equal to, and, if possible, superior to the one of the previous year. 

At the outset she was disappointed, for with a 

patched up team the Purple Sextette lost to 

Ocala by a score of 15 to 12. This was for the 

best, however, as it proved a stimulus and made 

the girls resolve to fight to the finish and win 

all other games. This spirit was shown in two 

victories over Stetson, first by a score of 17 to 

14, and the second by a score of 29 to 11. St. 

Augustine and St. Petersburg both were unable 

to cope with the Purple and White fighters and 

followed the path of defeat. 

Enthusiasm was supreme when Ocala met 

the Purple contenders in the return game at 

the University gymnasium. This time the as- 
piration of the Green and White for the state 

championship was blasted, for Gainesville won 

by 16 points. The Hurricane then went on its 

way unmolested. Palatka, Bradentown, and St. 

Petersburg were all swept before its might. 

On March 15 began the State Basketball 
Tournament, held at Stetson University, De- 
Land. G. H. S. again demonstrated the supe- 
rior quality of her "fighting teams" in three 
hard-fought games, played with Orlando. Lake- 
land and DeLand. respectively, winning the 
championship of Florida, and bringing home 
the beautiful silver trophy. 

Miss Edna Earle Chesnut cannot be given 
enough credit for her splendid work this year 
with the G. H. S. girls. With patience and tact, 
she took the Gainesville team through practice 
after practice, and carried to the second annual 
tourney a team whose wonderful team work 
was unequalled. 




Edna Earle Chesnut 
Coach 




Ellen Pepper 
Jumping Center 



Dot Bullard 

Running Center 



52 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




Nancy Baker De: 

Guards 




Ethel Tuucker 
Fonvards 



Schedule 



Place 

Ocala 

DeLand 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Gainesville 

Palatka 

Gainesville 

St. Petersburg 



Date 



Name 



Op'n't 



.Jan. 13 Ocala 15.. 

Jan. 20 Stetson 14. 

.Jan. 27 St. Augustine 7. 

..Feb. 3 Stetson 11.. 

..Feb. 9 Trenton 12. 

..Feb. 10 ......St. Petersburg 12.. 

..Feb. 17 Ocala 9.. 

..Feb. 23 ......Palatka 16. 

..Feb. 24 Bradentown 10. 

.Mar. 3 St. Petersburg 12.. 



G.H.S. 

12 

17 

17 

29 

32 

45 

25 

52 

30 

28 



DeLand 
DeLand 
DeLand 



Tournament 

Mar. 15 Orlando 

Mar. 16 Lakeland 

Mar. 16 DeLand 



9 


47 


1 12 


14 


23 


32 



53 



THE ALACHUAN 



192 3 





._■ 1 



I I il\ II. 

mcdowall 
Boone 
Bishop 




54 




THE ALACHUAN 1923 



BOYS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

"S MAY be seen by the record of the basketball season of 1923, this cham- 
pionship team is the best of its kind that G. H. S. has ever produced. While 
a great deal of credit must be given to the fighting spirit of the players, 
it was Coach Farrior who filled the team with the "pep" and "fight" that 
defeated Wauchula, Duval and Hillsboro in the final triumphant march to the cham- 
pionship. 

The season opened with the usual practice games to whip the team into shape 
and to bring out material. After the Montverde game the team settled down in ear- 
nest to go through to the tournament. This it did, but not without a few hotly con- 
tested games such as the games with Montverde and St. Petersburg. 

In the tournament the first game drawn was with Wauchula, supposedly the 
hardest team in the state to play, but it couldn't stand up against the Purple and 
White tossers, and so lost to a score of 33 to 30. The next morning Duval, the 
ancient rival of Gainesville, fell in defeat to a 23 to 19 score. However, the hardest 
game of the tournament came as the one deciding the championship between Gaines- 
ville and the Tampa Terriers. Both technically and sensationally, this was the best 
game of the tourney. However, the Purple aggregation came out on the top side 
of the score of 27 to 25, thereby defeating two of the strongest teams in the state in 
one day and becoming Gainesville's first championship boys' basketball team. Of 
the entire sixteen games played, including the U. of F. Rats, the team won fourteen, 
making a total number of 424 points to the opponents 214, nearly double. The 
average score for each game was 26.5 to the opponents 13.37. 



Season Schedule 



Team Place Date 

Trenton Gainesville Jan. 5 

Trenton Trenton Jan. 13 

Williston Gainesville Jan. 16 

Melrose Gainesville Jan. 18 

U. of F. Rats Gainesville Jan. 20 

St. Augustine Gainesville I Jan. 26 

St. Augustine St. Augustine Feb. 2 

Montverde Gainesville Feb. 9 

Trenton Second Team Feb. 9 

Dade City Cancelled Feb. 10 

Dade City Cancelled Feb. 16 

St. Petersburg St. Petersburg .Feb. 17 

Leesburg Leesburg '. Feb. 23 

Montverde Montverde Feb. 24 

Leesburg Gainesville Mar. 2 

St. Petersburg Gainesville Mar. 3 



G. H. S. Tournament Schedule 

Gainesville Wauchula 33 30 

Gainesville Duval 23 19 

Gainesville Hillsboro 27 25 



55 



G. H. S. Score 


Opp. 


13 


12 


19 


8 


, 44 


10 


39 


15 


11 


23 


34 


8 


36 


12 


25 


26 


34 


14 


2 





2 





36 


21 


26 


12 


23 


18 


36 


23 


44 


12 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




56 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



W 



BASEBALL 

'HEN the call was issued in early spring for baseball candidates to report 
for practice, the prospects for the Gainesville High baseball team looked 
very promising. A number of men who played last year reported for prac- 
tice, along with some new material that looked mighty good. After about 
two weeks of practice, the first contest of the season was played with the Dade City 
nine — a double-header. Gainesville was an easy victor in both contests. Boone 
pitched a no-hit game in the first contest, and Ludwig only gave up three hits in the 
second encounter. 

After the two games with Dade City the Purple nine journeyed to Saint Leo 
College and defeated the nine representing that school by the score of 9-4. Boone, 
who pitched a fine game for Gainesville, had the Saint Leo boys in his power at all 
times. The afternoon of the same day the Dade City team was defeated by the 
large score of 25-1. McDowall hurled for Gainesville. 

The following week the Purple defeated Inverness at Inverness two games. 
Ludwig pitched the first game and was an easy winner. The Inverness team was 
greatly strengthened by the addition of three town players to their line-up for the 
second game. Boone pitched for Gainesville and won his game by the score of 3-1, 
in an 11-inning contest. Tuesday of the following week Gainesville suffered the 
loss of her star pitcher, Roby Boone, who injured his ankle while running from third 
base to home in a practice game with the Freshman nine from the University of 
Florida. 

The following Saturday the Gainesville nine journeyed to Williston and received 
their first defeat of the season, the score being 6-4 in Williston's favor. Ludwig 
pitched for the locals. Williston was scheduled to play in Gainesville the follow- 
ing Thursday, but refused to play, so the Gainesville team played the Florida "Rats" 
on that day and defeated them by the score of 7-5. This game with the "Rats" 
ended the somewhat unfortunate season for Gainesville High. 

1923 Boys' Baseball Schedule 
Date Team Place G. H. S. Opp. 

April 14 Dade City Gainesville 7 

April 14 Dade City Gainesville 11 

April 20 St. Leo Colleg3 St. Leo Colleg: 9.. 4 

April 20 Dade City Dade City 25 1 

April 21 Dade City Dade City Cancelled 

April 27 Inverness Inverness 12 2 

April 28 .Inverness Inverness 3 1 

May 4 St. Augustine Gainesville Cancelled by mutual agreement 

May 5 Williston Williston 4 6 

May 11 Williston.... Gainesville Cancelled by Williston 

May 12 St. Augustine St. Augustine Cancelled by mutual agreement 

May 18-19 Tournament Orlando 

May 25 Duval Gainesville Cancelled 

May 26 Duval Gainesville Cancelled 



57 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




TRACK 

Championship Class 

Novice Class 



58 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



TRACK 

XN TRACK as in all other branches of athletics, Gainesville showed up fine 
under the expert coaching of Coach Rex Farrior. A great deal of interest 
was shown in the inter-class track meet in which all the available material 
of G. H. S. participated. The Seniors took the meet by a wide margin, the Juniors 
taking second place. At this meet the entries for the state meet were selected from 
the best talent displayed in the different events. 

At the Florida State High School track meet Gainesville was notably successful. 
Two records were broken by Coach Farrior's Purple and White athletes, the high 
jump by Jack McDowall and the 880-yard dash by Lamar Sarra, which, with the 
record made by Vickery last year in the 440, make three records held by Gainesville. 

Gainesville took by a good margin the novice meet, thus winning the novice 
meet and the championship cup, and won fourth place in the main meet. Out of the 
seven cups awarded, Gainesville, besides the championship cup, took cups in the 
championship sprint medley, the novice mile relay, and the novice sprint medley. 

Those whose work entitled them to represent the school at this meet were: 

Lamar Sarra Jim McClamroch Bill McKinstry 

Jack McDowall Albert Swartz Marshall Flowers 

Howard Bishop D. S. Fagan Bill Truby 

Lars Sanchez Ted Girard Maxie Dell 

Andrew Ludwig Sinclair Eaton Marvin Phifer 

Noyes Long Norton Killborne 

Lamar Sarra, Jack McDowall, and Howard Bishop especially deserve high 
credit for their work as do the other medal winners who won the meet for Gaines- 
ville. 

McDowall and Sarra Star in Interscholastic Meet 

Jack McDowall and Lamar Sarra represented G. H. S. in the Interscholastic 
Track and Field Meet at Chicago. This is the first year a Florida school has entered 
the Interscholastic Meet. Jack was second in the high jump, making a record ol 
5 ft. 11 in., and Lamar came out seventh in the 880-yard dash. 



59 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




60 







-I I 1 1 



THE ALACHUAN 



192 3 



G 




G 



GIRLS' 8 £ SKETBAU. 




BOYS' ft 

BASKETBALL 



FOOTBALL 



©IvIlP 



^y 



62 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 



WEARERS OF THE "G' 



Devaux Vrooman 

Andrew Ludwig 
Jack McDowall 
Donald Bishop 
Howard Bishop 
Lamar Sarra 



Football 

Lars Sanchez 
Ernest Bowyer 
Norton Kilbourn 
William Flowers 
C. G. Knight 
James Brinson 



Leland Hiatt 
Richard Weaver 
Huber Watson 
Willie Edelstein 
Edward Swearingen 
Joe Perry 



Boys 
Jack McDowall 
Lamar Sarra 
Lars Sanchez 
Howard Bishop 
Hayford Enwall 
Roby Boone 



Basketball 

Andrew Ludwig 
Huber Watson 
Bill Truby 
Donald Bishop 

Girls 
Ellen Pepper 
Mary Baker 



Dempsey Creary 
Dorothy Bullard 
Ethel Tucker 
Nancy Baker 
Melba Nunn 
Emily Dorsey 
Rosa Lee Williams 



Howard Bishop 
Noyes Long 
Andrew Ludwig 



Track 
Novice Class 

Ted Girard 
William Flowers 



D. S. Fagan 
Norton Kilbourn 
Bill Truby 



Jack McDowall 
Lamar Sarra 



Championship Class 

Lars Sanchez 
Joe Waugh 
Sidney Robertson 



Bill McKinstry 
U. G. Swartz 



Jack McDowall 
Robert Davis 
Edward Murphy 
Gardiner Welch 



Baseball 

Lars Sanchez 
Roby Boone 
Andrew Ludwig 
Lamar Sarra 
Dale Vansickle 



Huber Watson 
Bill Truby 
Norton Kilbourn 
Howard Bishop 



63 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




64 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



THE COMET 

QINETEEN-TWENTY is, indeed, a memorable date in the history of G. H. S., 
for it was in that year the first "Comet" was issued. From the first, plans 
for such a paper met with much enthusiasm and success, and the second 
year of its history the paper was enlarged from four to six pages. It was also made 
self-supporting by the generous spirit of the many merchants who advertised in its 
columns. 

The real value of "The Comet' to us is that it serves as a medium of ex- 
pression for the various forms of school life and activities. The Purple and White 
victories in athletics, the latest school jokes, and original compositions and editorials 
found in "The Comet" all tend towards the growth of "school spirit," literary work, 
and individual pride in our paper. This makes it one of the greatest assets of the 
school. 

Then, too, our Exchange Department keeps G. H. S. in touch with many other 
high schools of the state and country. 

Thus has "The Comet" grown and advanced and its future looks bright indeed 
if the students give the same hearty support and cooperation as they have in the past. 

The Comet Staff of 1922-23 

Cecil Gracy Editor-in-Chief 

Sue Spencer Assistant Editor 

Thelma Boltin Literary Editor 

Lamar Sarra Athletic Editor 

Miriam McKinstry Business Manager 

Ellen Pepper ) . . _ . ,„ ' 

_ } Assistant Business Managers 

Ruth Llvingston \ 

Tessie Glass Society Editor 

William Hawkins Joke Editor 

Hayford Enwall Senior Reporter 

Ethel Tucker Junior Reporter 

Sue McDonald .' Sophomore Reporter 

Anita Ellis Freshman Reporter 

Agnes McCormick Exchange Editor 

Marvin Phifer Circulation Manager 

Alice Parrish State High School Press Association Reporter 



65 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 



GLEE CLUB 

Miss L. Grier Director 

Alyene Graves Pianist 

Elizabeth Watts Secretary and Treasurer 



Thelma Boltin 
Faye Turner 
Hazel Turbyfill 
Elizabeth Harrold 
Esther Jordan 
Helen Cubberly 
Maude Ballentine 



Members 



Gaynelle Corbett 
Elizabeth Watts 
Alice Parrish 
Mary Kincaid 
Lillian Long 
Hortense Marable 
Kathryne Voyle 



Louise Bowers 




"T THE beginning of the 1922-23 school term, the Senior Class decided to 
start or revive the Glee Club. We were exceedingly fortunate in securing 
Miss Grier's help, and it is through her untiring efforts that the club has 
been a success. The whole club is very thankful to her for her assistance. 

At first, until everything was in working order, it was thought best to open 
the membership to Seniors only. After things were running smoothly the member- 
ship was opened to other classes. The club has sung in chapel several times. It 
gave a program in chapel before the Christmas holidays, singing Christmas carols 
and closing the exercises with "Holy Night", a quartet. It sang at the health plav 
given in the auditorium. The songs sung were the old folk songs which were in ac- 
cord with the play, "Uncle Remus." At the opening exercises in the new building, 
the club sang several numbers, among them being the "Fairyland Chorus" and the 
"Indian Song." 



66 



THt ALACHUA N 



1923 




VIRGIL CLUB 

Motto 
"Forsans et haec olim meminisse iuvabit" 

Teacher: J. Rex Farrior 



Eleanor Bryant 
Eddie Sue Colson 



Members 



Thomas Isler 



Elizabeth Gable 
William Hawkins, Jr. 



67 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 







LAMBDA SIGMA SIGMA 



Colors: Red and Gold 



Flower: Dahlia 



Purpose 

Social Improvement and Advancement of Sisterhood 



Active Members 



Catherine Davis 
Florence Dial 
Louise Kincaid 
Mary Kincaid 
Lillian Long 



Dorothy McClamroch 
Mary Parker McCraw 
Miriam McKinstry 
Dorothy Lartigue 
Lena Chancey 



Irene Colson 
Irene Denham 
Mable Edwards 
Annie Lee Farmer 



Alumnae 



Elizabeth Hammargren 
Lucile Boring Stringfellow 
Lillian Jones Weisenfeld 
Mary Lee Fowler Weir 



68 



THE ALACHUAN 



192 








G. 


G. 


CARD CLUB 




Color 
Green and While 










Flower 
Heartsease 




Gibbl 


>„G 


Motto 
abble, Gobble, Git 




Catherine Davis 
Florence Dial 
Esther Jordan 
Gladys Kelley 










Mary Kincaid 
Lillian Long 
Agnes McCormick 
Miriam McKinstry 



69 



THE ALACHU AN 1923 



AGNES McCORMICK ENTERTAINS SENIORS 

The members of the Senior Class and their teacher, Miss Woodbery, were charm- 
ingly entertained on the evening of May 11th, by a popular classmate, Agnes Mc- 
Cormick, at her home on West Main Street. 

The house was tastefully decorated with flowers and ferns. In the hall the High 
School colors — purple and white — were predominant, while in the living room were 
bowers of Shasta daisies, the class flower, and fern, which carried out the class colors 
of green and white. On the porch, which was bordered with bamboo, decorated with 
white blossoms and brightly lighted, Aline Kelley and Frances DePass served re- 
freshing fruit punch. 

After a pleasant evening of cards and dancing, refreshments of Neapolitan ice 
cream, small cakes, wafers and mints, again featuring the class colors, were served 
and enjoyed by all. 



DELIGHTFUL HALLOWE'EN PARTY 

Dr. and Mrs. H. 0. Enwall were host and hostess at a most enjoyable party 
given on Hallowe'en in honor of the Senior Class. Appropriate decorations for the 
season were carried out with black cats, wise owls and other symbols. The rooms 
were darkened, with only soft lights, shaded in yellow, casting a weird glow over 
costumed figures. Guests were met at the entrance by a ghost who extended an icy 
handclasp, and another ghost led the way to the chambers above, where wraps were 
laid off. The usual Hallowe'en games were enjoyed, an interesting feature being 
a trip up dark, winding stairs to the attic where a veritable witch was busy brewing 
sassafras tea in a big black pot. This she served to her callers and told them pleas- 
ing sketches of their past and future. 

Miss Thelma Boltin was winner of the prize for having the most clever cos- 
tume, and her trophy was a pretty calendar. Miss Agnes McCormick was next best 
and received a sewing basket as a prize. A Chinese mandarin appeared on the 
scene causing much fun and laughter. 

Late in the evening refreshments of ice cream, cakes, doughnuts, coflee and 
cocoa were served. 



70 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



JUNIOR-SENIOR BANQUET 

The handsome and commodious new High School building on University Ave- 
nue was the scene of a happy event May 4 when the Juniors tendered the annual 
banquet to the Seniors. 

Decorations evidenced the Senior Class colors of pink and lavender. An artis- 
tic arrangement of pink oleanders and the eight loving cups centered the festive 
board near by. These trophies were won by G. H. S. during the past year. Pink 
tapers placed at intervals cast a soft glow over the faces grouped around the table 
numbering more than one hundred. 

Miss Dorothy Lartigue, president of the Junior Class, was toastmaster and kept 
things interesting. The address by Mrs. Alice Parrish, on "The Streets of Today," 
was most excellent. 

During the evening Cecil Gracy, president of the Senior Class, on behalf of the 
class presented a large cut glass vase to be used in the Senior assembly room of the 
High School. Mr. Gracy also presented to Miss Mary Woodbery, teacher of the 
Senior Class, a lovely purple silk parasol with amber handle. 

Menu 

Chicken Soup 

Dinner Biscuits Hot Rolls 

Chicken 

Potatoes String Beans Beets 

Fruit Salad 

Ice Cream Cake 

Ice Tea Punch 

Mints 

Fruit Punch 



■71 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




v~ 



72 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 



BUB~B1.ES 




THAT 

BUftST 



73 



THE ALACHUAN 1923 



JOKES 

If it wasn't for Louise 

Would Lars come to school? 

If it wasn't for Miss Woodbery 

Would a Senior know he was a fool? 

If it wasn't for the dances 

Would any of us ever flunk? 

If it wasn't for Prof. 

Would manners in us be sunk? 



A sign on a blackboard read: "Track Meet in Room 11 Immediately After 
School." Did they hurdle over the desks or high jump out of the window? 



James Beall (in class) : Mis Swhite, oh Mis Swhite? 

Miss White: James, I wish you'd stop running an S over on my name. What 
if I did that every time I called Miss Ware? 

James Beall: That would be funny; I swear it would. 



TOLD WITH A SHIVER 

Miss White: George, what effect do Poe's tales have on you? 

George Smith: They make me feel glad I'm so little. I can hide easier then. 



HE! HO! 



Miriam McKinstry: Florence, do you like Bevo? 

Bill McCormick (standing a few yards away) : What's that? Who's talking 
about Deveaux? 



Mary McCormick: Say, from whom do all these vocational students out at the 
University take their vocal lessons? 



QUESTIONS ASKED AND ANSWERS RECEIVED 
"Miss Boltin, Miss Boltin, what makes you so fat?" 
"Law bless goodness! did you notice that?" 

"Andrew, Andrew, what makes your voice so strange?" 
"Aw' gwan, how can I stop the change?" 

"Mr. Powell, Mr. Powell, how came your hairs so slick?' 
"Foolish, didn't I teach Rudolph how to turn the trick?" 

"Melba, Melba, with your name what have you done?" 
"Oh, woe is me, for I have Nun." 



74 



THE ALACHUAN 



1923 




Charlie Harris (in library searching fruitlessly for lyric poetry in the Encyclo- 
pedia) : Where in 1 do you find Lyric, anyway? 

Hilda Mathis: Why, Charles, you naughty boy! 



Leahmon Dodd: Here's a chapter in the Trig book called "Plane Sailing." 
Esther Jordan: Well, it's the first plain sailing I've found about Trigonometry. 



Miss W oodbery : An example of metonymy is "the baby loves his bottle," or to 
make the illustration a little stronger, "the man loves his bottle." 



•75- 



THEALACHUAN 192 3 



Howard Bishop made a fine showing in the High School Track Meet. How- 
ever, he was not credited with quite all the points due him, for he holds the world'; 
record for the broad grin. 



Some Seniors surely do graduate gradually. 



MY FLAPPER SWEETHEART 
My love is like the wild west wind — she's fast; 
Her curls are like a full blown rose — won't last. 
Her lips are like the newly rich — put on. 
Her color when she's washed has face — is gone. 
Her eyes are like a serpent's eyes — they charm; 
Blind Cupid's darts affect her thus — no harm, 
But she's my honey — I'm her buzzing bee, 
A jelly bean in puppy love — that's me. 

— M. MelloiNE. 



WHY I WANT TO GRADUATE 

Lamar: So I can play ball with the "Baby Gators." 

Jack McDowall: Just to be through and have no:hing to do. 

Mary Parker McCraw: So I'll have time for the really important things (such 
as frat dances, you know!). 

Alice Parrish: So I can take charge of a certain little bungalow out in "High- 
lands." 

Annie Mae Gunn: Just to get a diploma to frame. (Then I bet people won't call 
me a child ! ) . 



WHY SENIORS STUDY 
Why we study English: Because Miss Woodbery says we must. 
Why we study Math: Cause we flunked it when we were Juniors, usually. 
Why we study French : So we can say "Good night"" without the chaperon 
calling us down. 

Why we study Science: So we can wear those "fetching" little black aprons! 
Why we study History: We don't — except for tests. 
Why we study at all: To graduate! 



GRADUATED 
"I'm free, I'm free, as the birds of the air; 

No one to govern, no one to care. 
When I say yes, no one to say no; 

So give me the reins and let me go!" 



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